Today it’s just a ruin on the north side of the River Forth.

But Kennetpans Distillery, near Kincardine in central Scotland, was once the largest distillery in the country and is said to be the “birthplace” of the Scottish whisky industry.

It was also once home to Scotland’s first rotative Boulton and Watt steam engine.

The distillery was founded in the early 18th century by brothers John and James Stein. The buildings which survive today probably date from the 1770s. (See a map to the site here.)

They were in production until the site closed in 1825. The site then started to fall into disrepair – and internal machinery and fittings removed.

In recent years, work has taken place to revamp the ruinous site – removing vegetation, consolidating buildings and creating new interpretation.

There have also been events to explain the buildings’ history to local people.

This video from the Inner Forth Landscape Initiative gives more information.

Find out more

Top picture: Kennetpans in 2012. By Richard Webb. Creative Commons Attribution Share-alike licence 2.0.

The engine house of Kennetpans Distillery, nr Clackmannan - showing the recess for the flywheel of the site's Boulton and Watt engine. The pic was taken before recent repairs started.
The engine house of Kennetpans Distillery – showing the recess for the flywheel of the site’s Boulton and Watt engine of 1806 (now removed from the site). This picture was taken before recent repairs started. Picture: MARK WATSON / Historic Environment Scotland.